Adverse reactions were well defined in a Phase 3 trial including 570 patients

5% of patients who received BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI permanently discontinued treatment due to adverse reactions1,2

The most common ARs resulting in permanent discontinuation were hemorrhage (2%) and headache (1%)1,2

Adverse reactions occurring in ≥10% of patients (all grades)1,2,*

Severity of AR (all grades)*

Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
General disorders and administration site conditions
Fatigue 43 46
Pyrexia 18 30
Peripheral edema 13 15
Gastrointestinal disorders
Nausea 41 34
Diarrhea 36 34
Vomiting 30 16
Abdominal pain 28 16
Constipation 22 6
Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders
Arthralgia 26 46
Myopathy 23 22
Pain in extremity 11 13
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Hyperkeratosis 23 49
Rash 22 53
Dry skin 16 26
Alopecia 14 38
Pruritus 13 21
Nervous system disorders
Headache 22 20
Dizziness 15 4
Peripheral neuropathy 12 13
Visual disorders
Visual impairment 20 4
Serous retinopathy/RPED 20 2
Vascular disorders
Hemorrhage 19 9
Hypertension 11 11

Severity of AR (grades 3/4)

Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
General disorders and administration site conditions
Fatigue 3 6
Pyrexia 4 0
Peripheral edema 1 1
Gastrointestinal disorders
Nausea 2 2
Diarrhea 3 2
Vomiting 2 1
Abdominal pain 4 1
Constipation 0 1
Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders
Arthralgia 1 6
Myopathy 0 1
Pain in extremity 1 1
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Hyperkeratosis 1 1
Rash 1 13
Dry skin 0 0
Alopecia 0 0
Pruritus 1 1
Nervous system disorders
Headache 2 1
Dizziness 3 0
Neuropathy 1 2
Visusl disorders
Visual impairment 0 0
Serous retinopathy 3 0
Vascular disorders
Hemorrhage 3 2
Hypertension 6 3
Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
Severity of AR All grades Grades 3/4 All grades Grades 3/4
General disorders and administration site conditions
Fatigue 43% 3% 46% 6%
Pyrexia 18% 4% 30% 0%
Peripheral edema 13% 1% 15% 1%
Gastrointestinal disorders
Nausea 41% 2% 34% 2%
Diarrhea 36% 3% 34% 2%
Vomiting 30% 2% 16% 1%
Abdominal pain 28% 4% 16% 1%
Constipation 22% 0% 6% 1%
Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders
Arthralgia 26% 1% 46% 6%
Myopathy 23% 0% 22% 1%
Pain in extremity 11% 1% 13% 1%
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
Hyperkeratosis 23% 1% 49% 1%
Rash 22% 1% 53% 13%
Dry skin 16% 0% 26% 0%
Alopecia 14% 0% 38% 0%
Pruritus 13% 1% 21% 1%
Nervous system disorders
Headache 22% 2% 20% 1%
Dizziness 15% 3% 4% 0%
Peripheral neuropathy 12% 1% 13% 2%
Visual disorders
Visual impairment 20% 0% 4% 0%
Serous retinopathy/RPED 20% 3% 2% 0%
Vascular disorders
Hemorrhage 19% 3% 9% 2%
Hypertension 11% 6% 11% 3%

*Grades per National Cancer Institute CTCAE v4.03.

Grade 4 adverse reactions limited to diarrhea (n=1), hemorrhage (n=3), fatigue (n=1), pruritus (n=1), and rash (n=1) in the BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI arm and constipation (n=1) in the vemurafenib arm.

Represents a composite of multiple, related preferred terms.

§This includes a dose adjustment (including dose interruptions and reductions) of BRAFTOVI, MEKTOVI, or both.

ARs, adverse reactions; RPED, retinal pigment epithelial detachment.

6.9 MONTHS

(95% CI: 3.1-10.7)

Median time to first dose interruption/reduction for patients receiving BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI9

  • This analysis was not pre-specified and is only descriptive in nature
BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI dose adjustments due to ARs9
37% BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI
vs 48% vemurafenib
  • The most common adverse reactions leading to dose interruptions1,2
    • BRAFTOVI-related: nausea (7%), vomiting (7%), and pyrexia (4%)
    • MEKTOVI-related: left ventricular dysfunction (6%) and serous retinopathy (5%)
  • The most common adverse reactions leading to dose reduction1,2
    • BRAFTOVI-related: arthralgia (2%), fatigue (2%), and nausea (2%)
    • MEKTOVI-related: left ventricular dysfunction (3%), serous retinopathy (3%), and colitis (2%)

Laboratory abnormalities as observed in the COLUMBUS trial1,2

Treatment-emergent lab abnormalities occurring in ≥10% of patients1,2

Severity of lab abnormality
(all grades)*

Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
Hematology
Anemia 36 34
Leukopenia 13 10
Lymphopenia 13 30
Neutropenia 13 4.8
Chemistry
Increased creatinine 93 92
Increased creatine phosphokinase 58 3.8
Increased
gamma glutamyl transferase
45 34
Increased ALT 29 27
Hyperglycemia 28 20
Increased AST 27 24
Increased alkaline phosphatase 21 35
Hyponatremia 18 15
Hypermagnesemia 10 26

Severity of lab abnormality
(grades 3/4)

Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
Hematology
Anemia 3.6 2.2
Leukopenia 0 0.5
Lymphopenia 2.1 7
Neutropenia 3.1 0.5
Chemistry
Increased creatinine 3.6 1.1
Increased creatine phosphokinase 5 0
Increased
gamma glutamyl transferase
11 4.8
Increased ALT 6 2.2
Hyperglycemia 5% 2.7%
Increased AST 2.6 1.6
Increased alkaline phosphatase 0.5 2.2
Hyponatremia 3.6 0.5
Hypermagnesemia 1 0.5

*Grades per National Cancer Institute CTCAE v4.03.

ALT, alanine aminotransferase; AST, aspartate aminotransferase; CTCAE, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events.

Trial arm BRAFTOVI 450 mg +
MEKTOVI 45 mg

(n=192)
vemurafenib
(n=186)
Severity of lab abnormality All grades Grades 3/4 All grades Grades 3/4
Hematology
Anemia 36% 3.6% 34% 2.2%
Leukopenia 13% 0% 10% 0.5%
Lymphopenia 13% 2.1% 30% 7%
Neutropenia 13% 3.1% 4.8% 0.5%
Chemistry
Increased creatinine 93% 3.6% 92% 1.1%
Increased
creatine phosphokinase
58% 5% 3.8% 0%
Increased
gamma glutamyl transferase
45% 11% 34% 4.8%
Increased ALT 29% 6% 27% 2.2%
Hyperglycemia 28% 5% 20% 2.7%
Increased AST 27% 2.6% 24% 1.6%
Increased alkaline phosphatase 21% 0.5% 35% 2.2%
Hyponatremia 18% 3.6% 15% 0.5%
Hypermagnesemia 10% 1% 26% 0.5%

*Grades per National Cancer Institute CTCAE v4.03.

ALT, alanine aminotransferase; AST, aspartate aminotransferase; CTCAE, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events.

Explore the full prescribing information

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

New Primary Malignancies, cutaneous and non-cutaneous malignancies can occur. In the COLUMBUS trial, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC), including keratoacanthoma (KA), occurred in 2.6% and basal cell carcinoma occurred in 1.6% of patients. Median time to first occurrence of cuSCC/KA was 5.8 months. Perform dermatologic evaluations prior to initiating treatment, every 2 months during treatment, and for up to 6 months following discontinuation of treatment. Manage suspicious skin lesions with excision and dermatopathologic evaluation. Dose modification is not recommended for new primary cutaneous malignancies. Based on its mechanism of action, BRAFTOVI may promote malignancies associated with activation of RAS through mutation or other mechanisms. Monitor patients receiving BRAFTOVI for signs and symptoms of non-cutaneous malignancies. Discontinue BRAFTOVI for RAS mutation-positive non-cutaneous malignancies.

Tumor Promotion in BRAF Wild-Type Tumors: In vitro experiments have demonstrated paradoxical activation of MAP-kinase signaling and increased cell proliferation in BRAF wild-type cells exposed to BRAF inhibitors. Confirm evidence of BRAF V600E or V600K mutation prior to initiating BRAFTOVI.

Cardiomyopathy, manifesting as left ventricular dysfunction associated with symptomatic or asymptomatic decreases in ejection fraction, has been reported in patients. In the COLUMBUS trial, evidence of cardiomyopathy occurred in 7% and Grade 3 left ventricular dysfunction occurred in 1.6% of patients. The median time to first occurrence of left ventricular dysfunction (any grade) was 3.6 months. Cardiomyopathy resolved in 87% of patients. Assess LVEF by echocardiogram or MUGA scan prior to initiating treatment, 1 month after initiating treatment, and then every 2 to 3 months during treatment. The safety has not been established in patients with a baseline ejection fraction that is either below 50% or below the institutional lower limit of normal (LLN). Patients with cardiovascular risk factors should be monitored closely.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): In the COLUMBUS trial, VTE occurred in 6% of patients, including 3.1% of patients who developed pulmonary embolism.

Hemorrhage: In the COLUMBUS trial, hemorrhage occurred in 19% of patients and ≥ Grade 3 hemorrhage occurred in 3.2% of patients. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of new or progressive brain metastases occurred in 1.6% of patients. The most frequent hemorrhagic events were gastrointestinal, including rectal hemorrhage (4.2%), hematochezia (3.1%), and hemorrhoidal hemorrhage (1%).

Ocular Toxicities: In the COLUMBUS trial, serous retinopathy occurred in 20% of patients; 8% were retinal detachment and 6% were macular edema. Symptomatic serous retinopathy occurred in 8% of patients with no cases of blindness. The median time to onset of the first event of serous retinopathy (all grades) was 1.2 months. RVO is a known class-related adverse reaction of MEK inhibitors and may occur in patients treated with MEKTOVI in combination with encorafenib. In patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma across multiple clinical trials, 0.1% of patients experienced retinal vein occlusion (RVO). The safety of MEKTOVI has not been established in patients with a history of RVO or current risk factors for RVO including uncontrolled glaucoma or a history of hyperviscosity or hypercoagulability syndromes. Perform ophthalmological evaluation for patient-reported acute vision loss or other visual disturbance within 24 hours. Permanently discontinue MEKTOVI in patients with documented RVO. In COLUMBUS, uveitis, including iritis and iridocyclitis was reported in 4% of patients treated with MEKTOVI in combination with BRAFTOVI. Assess for visual symptoms at each visit. Perform an ophthalmological evaluation at regular intervals and for new or worsening visual disturbances, and to follow new or persistent ophthalmologic findings.

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): ILD, including pneumonitis occurred in 0.3% of patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma across multiple clinical trials. Assess new or progressive unexplained pulmonary symptoms or findings for possible ILD.

Hepatotoxicity: In the COLUMBUS trial, the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 increases in liver function laboratory tests was 6% for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), 2.6% for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and 0.5% for alkaline phosphatase. No patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 serum bilirubin elevation. Monitor liver laboratory tests before initiation of MEKTOVI, monthly during treatment, and as clinically indicated.

Rhabdomyolysis: In the COLUMBUS trial, elevation of laboratory values of serum CPK occurred in 58% of patients. Rhabdomyolysis was reported in 0.1% of patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma receiving MEKTOVI with encorafenib across multiple clinical trials. Monitor CPK and creatinine levels prior to initiating MEKTOVI, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated.

QTc Prolongation: BRAFTOVI is associated with dose-dependent QTc interval prolongation in some patients. In the COLUMBUS trial, an increase in QTcF to > 500 ms was measured in 0.5% (1/192) of patients. Monitor patients who already have or who are at significant risk of developing QTc prolongation, including patients with known long QT syndromes, clinically significant bradyarrhythmias, severe or uncontrolled heart failure and those taking other medicinal products associated with QT prolongation. Correct hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia prior to and during BRAFTOVI administration. Withhold, reduce dose, or permanently discontinue for QTc > 500 ms.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: BRAFTOVI or MEKTOVI can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. BRAFTOVI can render hormonal contraceptives ineffective. Nonhormonal contraceptives should be used during treatment and for at least 30 days after the final dose for patients taking BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI.

Risks Associated with BRAFTOVI as a Single Agent: There is an increased risk of certain adverse reactions compared to when BRAFTOVI is used in combination with MEKTOVI. Grades 3 or 4 dermatologic reactions occurred in 21% of BRAFTOVI single agent compared to 2% in patients treated with BRAFTOVI in combination with MEKTOVI. If MEKTOVI is temporarily interrupted or permanently discontinued, reduce the dose of BRAFTOVI as recommended.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%, all Grades, in the COLUMBUS trial): were fatigue (43%), nausea (41%), diarrhea (36%), vomiting (30%), abdominal pain (28%), arthralgia (26%), myopathy (23%), hyperkeratosis (23%), rash (22%), headache (22%), constipation (22%), visual impairment (20%), serous retinopathy (20%). Other clinically important adverse reactions occurring in <10% of patients in the COLUMBUS Trial were facial paresis, pancreatitis, panniculitis, drug hypersensitivity and colitis.

In the COLUMBUS Trial, the most common laboratory abnormalities (all grades) (≥ 20%) included increased creatinine (93%), increased creatine phosphokinase (58%), increased gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) (45%), anemia (36%), increased ALT (29%), hyperglycemia (28%), increased AST (27%), and increased alkaline phosphatase (21%).

The information above applies to the safety of the combination of BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI unless otherwise noted. See full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and for MEKTOVI for dose modifications for adverse reactions.

The information above applies to the safety of the combination of BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI unless otherwise noted. See full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and for MEKTOVI for dose modifications for adverse reactions.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Avoid concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers and sensitive CYP3A4 substrates with BRAFTOVI. Modify BRAFTOVI dose if concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors cannot be avoided. Avoid coadministration of BRAFTOVI with medicinal products with a known potential to prolong QT/QTc interval.

Please see full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and full Prescribing Information for MEKTOVI for additional information.

Indications and Usage

BRAFTOVI® (encorafenib) and MEKTOVI® (binimetinib) are kinase inhibitors indicated for use in combination for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600E or V600K mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test.

Limitations of Use: BRAFTOVI is not indicated for treatment of patients with wild-type BRAF melanoma.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

New Primary Malignancies, cutaneous and non-cutaneous malignancies can occur. In the COLUMBUS trial, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cuSCC), including keratoacanthoma (KA), occurred in 2.6% and basal cell carcinoma occurred in 1.6% of patients. Median time to first occurrence of cuSCC/KA was 5.8 months. Perform dermatologic evaluations prior to initiating treatment, every 2 months during treatment, and for up to 6 months following discontinuation of treatment. Manage suspicious skin lesions with excision and dermatopathologic evaluation. Dose modification is not recommended for new primary cutaneous malignancies. Based on its mechanism of action, BRAFTOVI may promote malignancies associated with activation of RAS through mutation or other mechanisms. Monitor patients receiving BRAFTOVI for signs and symptoms of non-cutaneous malignancies. Discontinue BRAFTOVI for RAS mutation-positive non-cutaneous malignancies.

Tumor Promotion in BRAF Wild-Type Tumors: In vitro experiments have demonstrated paradoxical activation of MAP-kinase signaling and increased cell proliferation in BRAF wild-type cells exposed to BRAF inhibitors. Confirm evidence of BRAF V600E or V600K mutation prior to initiating BRAFTOVI.

Cardiomyopathy, manifesting as left ventricular dysfunction associated with symptomatic or asymptomatic decreases in ejection fraction, has been reported in patients. In the COLUMBUS trial, evidence of cardiomyopathy occurred in 7% and Grade 3 left ventricular dysfunction occurred in 1.6% of patients. The median time to first occurrence of left ventricular dysfunction (any grade) was 3.6 months. Cardiomyopathy resolved in 87% of patients. Assess LVEF by echocardiogram or MUGA scan prior to initiating treatment, 1 month after initiating treatment, and then every 2 to 3 months during treatment. The safety has not been established in patients with a baseline ejection fraction that is either below 50% or below the institutional lower limit of normal (LLN). Patients with cardiovascular risk factors should be monitored closely.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): In the COLUMBUS trial, VTE occurred in 6% of patients, including 3.1% of patients who developed pulmonary embolism.

Hemorrhage: In the COLUMBUS trial, hemorrhage occurred in 19% of patients and ≥ Grade 3 hemorrhage occurred in 3.2% of patients. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of new or progressive brain metastases occurred in 1.6% of patients. The most frequent hemorrhagic events were gastrointestinal, including rectal hemorrhage (4.2%), hematochezia (3.1%), and hemorrhoidal hemorrhage (1%).

Ocular Toxicities: In the COLUMBUS trial, serous retinopathy occurred in 20% of patients; 8% were retinal detachment and 6% were macular edema. Symptomatic serous retinopathy occurred in 8% of patients with no cases of blindness. The median time to onset of the first event of serous retinopathy (all grades) was 1.2 months. RVO is a known class-related adverse reaction of MEK inhibitors and may occur in patients treated with MEKTOVI in combination with encorafenib. In patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma across multiple clinical trials, 0.1% of patients experienced retinal vein occlusion (RVO). The safety of MEKTOVI has not been established in patients with a history of RVO or current risk factors for RVO including uncontrolled glaucoma or a history of hyperviscosity or hypercoagulability syndromes. Perform ophthalmological evaluation for patient-reported acute vision loss or other visual disturbance within 24 hours. Permanently discontinue MEKTOVI in patients with documented RVO. In COLUMBUS, uveitis, including iritis and iridocyclitis was reported in 4% of patients treated with MEKTOVI in combination with BRAFTOVI. Assess for visual symptoms at each visit. Perform an ophthalmological evaluation at regular intervals and for new or worsening visual disturbances, and to follow new or persistent ophthalmologic findings.

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): ILD, including pneumonitis occurred in 0.3% of patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma across multiple clinical trials. Assess new or progressive unexplained pulmonary symptoms or findings for possible ILD.

Hepatotoxicity: In the COLUMBUS trial, the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 increases in liver function laboratory tests was 6% for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), 2.6% for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and 0.5% for alkaline phosphatase. No patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 serum bilirubin elevation. Monitor liver laboratory tests before initiation of MEKTOVI, monthly during treatment, and as clinically indicated.

Rhabdomyolysis: In the COLUMBUS trial, elevation of laboratory values of serum CPK occurred in 58% of patients. Rhabdomyolysis was reported in 0.1% of patients with BRAF mutation-positive melanoma receiving MEKTOVI with encorafenib across multiple clinical trials. Monitor CPK and creatinine levels prior to initiating MEKTOVI, periodically during treatment, and as clinically indicated.

QTc Prolongation: BRAFTOVI is associated with dose-dependent QTc interval prolongation in some patients. In the COLUMBUS trial, an increase in QTcF to > 500 ms was measured in 0.5% (1/192) of patients. Monitor patients who already have or who are at significant risk of developing QTc prolongation, including patients with known long QT syndromes, clinically significant bradyarrhythmias, severe or uncontrolled heart failure and those taking other medicinal products associated with QT prolongation. Correct hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia prior to and during BRAFTOVI administration. Withhold, reduce dose, or permanently discontinue for QTc > 500 ms.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: BRAFTOVI or MEKTOVI can cause fetal harm when administered to pregnant women. BRAFTOVI can render hormonal contraceptives ineffective. Nonhormonal contraceptives should be used during treatment and for at least 30 days after the final dose for patients taking BRAFTOVI + MEKTOVI.

Risks Associated with BRAFTOVI as a Single Agent: There is an increased risk of certain adverse reactions compared to when BRAFTOVI is used in combination with MEKTOVI. Grades 3 or 4 dermatologic reactions occurred in 21% of BRAFTOVI single agent compared to 2% in patients treated with BRAFTOVI in combination with MEKTOVI. If MEKTOVI is temporarily interrupted or permanently discontinued, reduce the dose of BRAFTOVI as recommended.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%, all Grades, in the COLUMBUS trial): were fatigue (43%), nausea (41%), diarrhea (36%), vomiting (30%), abdominal pain (28%), arthralgia (26%), myopathy (23%), hyperkeratosis (23%), rash (22%), headache (22%), constipation (22%), visual impairment (20%), serous retinopathy (20%). Other clinically important adverse reactions occurring in <10% of patients in the COLUMBUS Trial were facial paresis, pancreatitis, panniculitis, drug hypersensitivity and colitis.

In the COLUMBUS Trial, the most common laboratory abnormalities (all grades) (≥ 20%) included increased creatinine (93%), increased creatine phosphokinase (58%), increased gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) (45%), anemia (36%), increased ALT (29%), hyperglycemia (28%), increased AST (27%), and increased alkaline phosphatase (21%).

The information above applies to the safety of the combination of BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI unless otherwise noted. See full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and for MEKTOVI for dose modifications for adverse reactions.

The information above applies to the safety of the combination of BRAFTOVI and MEKTOVI unless otherwise noted. See full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and for MEKTOVI for dose modifications for adverse reactions.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Avoid concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers and sensitive CYP3A4 substrates with BRAFTOVI. Modify BRAFTOVI dose if concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors cannot be avoided. Avoid coadministration of BRAFTOVI with medicinal products with a known potential to prolong QT/QTc interval.

Please see full Prescribing Information for BRAFTOVI and full Prescribing Information for MEKTOVI for additional information.

Indications and Usage

BRAFTOVI® (encorafenib) and MEKTOVI® (binimetinib) are kinase inhibitors indicated for use in combination for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600E or V600K mutation as detected by an FDA-approved test.

Limitations of Use: BRAFTOVI is not indicated for treatment of patients with wild-type BRAF melanoma.

References: 1. Braftovi® (encorafenib) Prescribing Information. Boulder, CO: Array BioPharma Inc, 01/19. 2. Mektovi® (binimetinib) Prescribing Information. Boulder, CO: Array BioPharma Inc, 01/19. 3. Dummer R, Ascierto PA, Gogas HJ, et al. Overall survival in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma receiving encorafenib plus binimetinib versus vemurafenib or encorafenib (COLUMBUS): a multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. Published online September 12, 2018 doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30497-2. 4. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Cutaneous Melanoma V.1.2019. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Accessed December 12, 2018. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org. 5. Dummer R, Ascierto PA, Gogas HJ, et al. Encorafenib plus binimetinib versus vemurafenib or encorafenib in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma (COLUMBUS): a multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. 2018;19(5)603-615. 6. Long GV, Stroyakovskiy D, Gogas HJ, et al. Dabrafenib and trametinib versus dabrafenib and placebo for Val600 BRAF-mutant melanoma: a multicentre, double-blind, phase 3 randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2015;386(9992):444-451. 7. Robert C, Karaszewska B, Schachter J, et al. Improved overall survival in melanoma with combined dabrafenib and trametinib. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(1):30-39. 8. Ascierto PA, McArthur GA, Dréno B, et al. Cobimetinib combined with vemurafenib in advanced BRAF(V600)-mutant melanoma (coBRIM): updated efficacy results from a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. 2016;17(9):1248-1260. 9. Data on file. Array BioPharma, Inc. 10. Lebbe C, Lorigan P, Ascierto P, et al. Treatment patterns and outcomes among patients diagnosed with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma in Europe: a retrospective, longitudinal survey (MELODY study). Eur J Cancer. 2012;48(17):3205-3214. 11. Hall A, Meyle KD, Lange MK, et al. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the (V600E) BRAF oncogene. Oncotarget. 2013;4(4):585-599. 12. Delord JP, Robert C, Nyakas M, et al. Phase I dose-escalation and -expansion study of the BRAF inhibitor encorafenib (LGX818) in metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma. Clin Cancer Res. 2017;23(18):5339-5348. 13. Koelblinger P, Thuerigen O, Dummer R. Development of encorafenib for BRAF-mutated advanced melanoma. Curr Opin Oncol. 2018;30(2):125-133. 14. Bollag G, Hirth P, Tsai J, et al. Clinical efficacy of a RAF inhibitor needs broad target blockade in BRAF-mutant melanoma. Nature. 2010;467(7315):596-599.